Popular chat service Discord experienced issues today due to network problems at Cloudflare and a wider internet issue. The app was inaccessible for its millions of users, and even Discord’s website and status pages were struggling. Discord’s problems could be traced to an outage at Cloudflare, a content delivery network. Cloudflare started experiencing issues at 7:43AM ET, and this caused Discord, Feedly, Crunchyroll, and many other sites that rely on its services to have partial outages.

Cloudflare says it’s working on a “possible route leak” affecting some of its network, but services like Discord have been inaccessible for nearly 45 minutes now. “Discord is affected by the general internet outage,” says a Discord statement on the company’s status site. “Hang tight. Pet your cats.”

“This leak is impacting many internet services including Cloudflare,” says a Cloudflare spokesperson. “We are continuing to work with the network provider that created this route leak to remove it.” Cloudflare doesn’t name the network involved, but Verizon is also experiencing widespread issues across the East Coast of the US this morning. Cloudflare notes that “the network responsible for the route leak has now fixed the issue,” so services should start to return to normal shortly.

Cloudfare explained the outage in an additional statement, commenting that “Earlier today, a widespread BGP routing leak affected a number of Internet services and a portion of traffic to Cloudflare. All of Cloudflare’s systems continued to run normally, but traffic wasn’t getting to us for a portion of our domains. At this point, the network outage has been fixed and traffic levels are returning to normal.”

Source: https://www.theverge.com/2019/6/24/18715308/discord-down-outage-cloudflare-problems-crunchyroll-feedly

Botnets in 2018 continued to use DDoS as their primary weapon to attack high-speed networks, according to NSFOCUS.

Continuous monitoring and research of botnets discovered significant changes taking place in the coding of malware used to create bots, operations, and maintenance of botnets and IP Chain-Gangs.

Throughout 2018, NSFOCUS developed profiles on 82 IP Chain-Gangs, groups of bots from multiple botnets acting in concert during specific cyber-attack campaigns. Understanding botnets in general and IP Chain-Gangs, in particular, helps improve defensive strategies and, thus, the ability to better mitigate attacks.

Key findings

  • NSFOCUS detected 111,472 attack instructions from botnet families that were received by a total of 451,187 attack targets, an increase of 66.4 percent from last year.
  • The U.S. (47.2 percent) and China (39.78 percent) were the two worst-hit countries when it came to botnet attacks.
  • Statistical analysis shows that gambling and porn websites were the most targeted, suffering 29,161 (an average of 79 per day) DDoS attacks throughout 2018.
  • Botnets were shifted from Windows platforms towards Linux and IoT platforms, leading to the fast decline of older Windows-based families and the thriving of new IoT-based ones.
  • As for platforms hosting Command and Control (C&C) servers, families using IoT platforms, though smaller in quantity, were more active, attracting 87 percent of attackers.
  • In 2018, a total of 35 active families were found to issue more than 100 botnet instructions, accounting for 24 percent of all known families. Several families with the highest level of instruction activity accounted for most of the malicious activities throughout 2018.

“Security service providers need to adapt their strategies to better mitigate the increasing threats posed by the new generation of botnets,” said Richard Zhao, COO at NSFOCUS.

“As defenders, we not only need to enhance our capabilities of countering ransomware and cryptominers but also need to improve the protections for IoT devices.

“While the total number of IoT devices globally surges rapidly and IoT product lines are increasingly diversified, IoT devices still have poor security. Insecure firmware and communication protocols lead to numerous vulnerabilities in IoT platforms.”

Source: https://www.helpnetsecurity.com/2019/06/20/botnets-shift/

Update June 18, 2019 3:20pm CT: Ubisoft has resolved issues stemming from today’s DDoS attack and all services have been restored.

 Ubisoft says it’s suffering from a series of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. They hit right as Rainbow Six Siege’s Operation Phantom Sight is getting underway and are currently affecting server connectivity and latency.

In a DDoS attack, a web service or website is flooded with an overwhelming amount of traffic making it unstable and unusable. While it’s not clear who’s responsible for the attack, Ubisoft says it’s working to remedy the issues, according to its support page. Ubisoft put out a similar statement when it was hit by a large DDoS attack just under a year ago.

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Fans should be aware that Ubisoft services are likely to be impacted until the issue is resolved. Last time a large scale DDoS attack hit Ubisoft it took about 10 hours for the company to be able to remedy the situation.

With the new operators of Operation Phantom Sight just being rolled out for all to play, it’s a bummer that some may not get to try them out until the issue is resolved.

Source: https://dotesports.com/rainbow-6/news/ubisoft-hit-with-string-of-ddos-attacks-just-as-r6s-operation-phantom-sight-goes-live

While there were fewer cyber threat incidents in Singapore last year, the republic continues to be the target for cyber attacks by advanced threat actors, the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore (CSA) said in its third annual Cyber Landscape report.

Here is a look at six alarming cyber security trends highlighted in the report:

DATA BREACHES

With data becoming the most valued currency or “commodity” in cyberspace, the CSA said that cyber criminals will try even harder to breach electronic databases.

Those that store large amounts of private and personal information will be the biggest target for hackers and cyber criminals.

The data breach involving healthcare cluster SingHealth was Singapore’s worst cyber attack, with the personal information of more than 1.5 million patients – including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong – stolen by hackers in June last year.

THREATS TO GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

Supply chains that consumers depend on for their goods are increasingly becoming interconnected and automated thanks to rapidly developing technology.

But the CSA warned that cyber criminals are trying to disrupt them. This could be for reasons such as extracting information from the companies involved in these supply chains, or holding them to ransom. Industries dominated by a few companies are especially vulnerable as problems in one stage of production could potentially lead to a breakdown in the entire supply chain.

ATTACKS ON CLOUD DATABASES

An increasing number of databases are being hosted in the cloud, which is where software and systems are designed specifically to be deployed over a network.

This means that cyber criminals will be on the lookout to exploit potential vulnerabilities in cloud infrastructure.

“While their primary goal remains data theft, threat actors will also try to exploit cloud services for other malicious aims, such as to amplify Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks,” the agency said in its report.

SMART BUILDINGS AND CONNECTED SYSTEMS

The advent of Internet of Things (IoT) devices and connected industrial control systems in buildings and factories might improve and quicken processes, but it also means that they are open to more danger.

As these buildings and systems become ‘smarter’, the risk of them being attacked to hold their owners to ransom, or be exploited to spread malware or conduct DDoS attacks, also increases, said CSA.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (AI)

AI will be able to significantly enhance the capabilities of security systems in cases such as detecting unusual behaviour and rolling out appropriate responses and mitigation measures in the case of an attack.

But the CSA warned that threat actors can also use AI to search for vulnerabilities in computer systems.

It could also potentially be used to create malicious software that bypasses existing online security measures in an organisation.

BIOMETRIC DATA

As biometric authentication, such as the use of fingerprints or facial scanning, becomes increasingly common, threat actors will shift to target and manipulate biometric data, to build virtual identities and gain access to personal information.

Source: https://www.straitstimes.com/tech/six-alarming-cyber-security-trends-highlighted-by-the-csa

We live in a world where foreign governments are routinely accused of cyber meddling to subvert democratic elections. Is anyone surprised that an authoritarian government is blamed for a massive DDoS attack that shut down Telegram – a key social media channel used to organize dissent and protest?

What is perhaps surprising in this case, is that the social media channel was Telegram, famous for being the most secure messaging app. Telegram’s security is based on encryption, distributed servers, and an optional message self-destruction feature. So, the content of your messages on Telegram should be pretty safe.

BUT if the service is unavailable, all that security is useless. That’s the sinister beauty of DDoS – Distributed Denial of Service. When a DDoS attack floods your network, overwhelming your infrastructure – with up to Terabits per Second of garbage data – it doesn’t matter how secure your service is.  Nobody can access it.

DDoS isn’t only about denial of service. Sometimes it’s used as an enabler for other cybercrimes. While services (including aspects of network security) are down, other malicious software may be infiltrated into your network devices resulting in massive data breaches, ransomware, theft of IP and more.

DDoS Attacks: Bad and Getting Worse

DDoS is here and it’s not going away! It seems that every month we hear about a new, record-breaking DDoS attack—and it’s not surprising that many types of DDoS attacks are referred to as floods—there is even one called a Tsunami—because their impact is overwhelming. They marshal a bot army of infected network devices to inundate and flood network resources, including elements such as firewalls that are intended to ensure network security.

How will 5G affect DDoS attacks?

5G holds a lot of promise for improved communications but may well worsen the DDoS nightmare. 5G’s anticipated exponential spread of high-speed bandwidth and connected IoT means that in addition to widespread motivation, easily available attack tools, and proliferating IoT attack sources, dramatically bigger attacks will be possible because the “5G highway” will have many more lanes to enable vastly higher rates of traffic—both good and bad. In the words of Brijesh Datta, the CSIO of Reliance Jio, “5G’s bandwidth will easily flood servers…with 5G, every individual would have a 1 Gbps worth of bandwidth, thereby attacks would become more drastic.”

What should service providers do to secure their network against DDoS attacks? 

In a whitepaper focused on service providers, but equally applicable to enterprises, Frost and Sullivan stress the following points:

  1. “…service providers may be better served by high-performance DDoS mitigation appliances with sufficient scalability to eliminate attacks, inline and in real time
  2. “An inline solution that provides DPI-based policy control capabilities ensures that firewalls and other security infrastructure are protected and functional at all times.”

Source: https://securityboulevard.com/2019/06/telegram-hit-by-powerful-ddos-attack-blames-china/