Update June 18, 2019 3:20pm CT: Ubisoft has resolved issues stemming from today’s DDoS attack and all services have been restored.

 Ubisoft says it’s suffering from a series of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. They hit right as Rainbow Six Siege’s Operation Phantom Sight is getting underway and are currently affecting server connectivity and latency.

In a DDoS attack, a web service or website is flooded with an overwhelming amount of traffic making it unstable and unusable. While it’s not clear who’s responsible for the attack, Ubisoft says it’s working to remedy the issues, according to its support page. Ubisoft put out a similar statement when it was hit by a large DDoS attack just under a year ago.

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Fans should be aware that Ubisoft services are likely to be impacted until the issue is resolved. Last time a large scale DDoS attack hit Ubisoft it took about 10 hours for the company to be able to remedy the situation.

With the new operators of Operation Phantom Sight just being rolled out for all to play, it’s a bummer that some may not get to try them out until the issue is resolved.

Source: https://dotesports.com/rainbow-6/news/ubisoft-hit-with-string-of-ddos-attacks-just-as-r6s-operation-phantom-sight-goes-live

While there were fewer cyber threat incidents in Singapore last year, the republic continues to be the target for cyber attacks by advanced threat actors, the Cyber Security Agency of Singapore (CSA) said in its third annual Cyber Landscape report.

Here is a look at six alarming cyber security trends highlighted in the report:

DATA BREACHES

With data becoming the most valued currency or “commodity” in cyberspace, the CSA said that cyber criminals will try even harder to breach electronic databases.

Those that store large amounts of private and personal information will be the biggest target for hackers and cyber criminals.

The data breach involving healthcare cluster SingHealth was Singapore’s worst cyber attack, with the personal information of more than 1.5 million patients – including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong – stolen by hackers in June last year.

THREATS TO GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAINS

Supply chains that consumers depend on for their goods are increasingly becoming interconnected and automated thanks to rapidly developing technology.

But the CSA warned that cyber criminals are trying to disrupt them. This could be for reasons such as extracting information from the companies involved in these supply chains, or holding them to ransom. Industries dominated by a few companies are especially vulnerable as problems in one stage of production could potentially lead to a breakdown in the entire supply chain.

ATTACKS ON CLOUD DATABASES

An increasing number of databases are being hosted in the cloud, which is where software and systems are designed specifically to be deployed over a network.

This means that cyber criminals will be on the lookout to exploit potential vulnerabilities in cloud infrastructure.

“While their primary goal remains data theft, threat actors will also try to exploit cloud services for other malicious aims, such as to amplify Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attacks,” the agency said in its report.

SMART BUILDINGS AND CONNECTED SYSTEMS

The advent of Internet of Things (IoT) devices and connected industrial control systems in buildings and factories might improve and quicken processes, but it also means that they are open to more danger.

As these buildings and systems become ‘smarter’, the risk of them being attacked to hold their owners to ransom, or be exploited to spread malware or conduct DDoS attacks, also increases, said CSA.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (AI)

AI will be able to significantly enhance the capabilities of security systems in cases such as detecting unusual behaviour and rolling out appropriate responses and mitigation measures in the case of an attack.

But the CSA warned that threat actors can also use AI to search for vulnerabilities in computer systems.

It could also potentially be used to create malicious software that bypasses existing online security measures in an organisation.

BIOMETRIC DATA

As biometric authentication, such as the use of fingerprints or facial scanning, becomes increasingly common, threat actors will shift to target and manipulate biometric data, to build virtual identities and gain access to personal information.

Source: https://www.straitstimes.com/tech/six-alarming-cyber-security-trends-highlighted-by-the-csa

We live in a world where foreign governments are routinely accused of cyber meddling to subvert democratic elections. Is anyone surprised that an authoritarian government is blamed for a massive DDoS attack that shut down Telegram – a key social media channel used to organize dissent and protest?

What is perhaps surprising in this case, is that the social media channel was Telegram, famous for being the most secure messaging app. Telegram’s security is based on encryption, distributed servers, and an optional message self-destruction feature. So, the content of your messages on Telegram should be pretty safe.

BUT if the service is unavailable, all that security is useless. That’s the sinister beauty of DDoS – Distributed Denial of Service. When a DDoS attack floods your network, overwhelming your infrastructure – with up to Terabits per Second of garbage data – it doesn’t matter how secure your service is.  Nobody can access it.

DDoS isn’t only about denial of service. Sometimes it’s used as an enabler for other cybercrimes. While services (including aspects of network security) are down, other malicious software may be infiltrated into your network devices resulting in massive data breaches, ransomware, theft of IP and more.

DDoS Attacks: Bad and Getting Worse

DDoS is here and it’s not going away! It seems that every month we hear about a new, record-breaking DDoS attack—and it’s not surprising that many types of DDoS attacks are referred to as floods—there is even one called a Tsunami—because their impact is overwhelming. They marshal a bot army of infected network devices to inundate and flood network resources, including elements such as firewalls that are intended to ensure network security.

How will 5G affect DDoS attacks?

5G holds a lot of promise for improved communications but may well worsen the DDoS nightmare. 5G’s anticipated exponential spread of high-speed bandwidth and connected IoT means that in addition to widespread motivation, easily available attack tools, and proliferating IoT attack sources, dramatically bigger attacks will be possible because the “5G highway” will have many more lanes to enable vastly higher rates of traffic—both good and bad. In the words of Brijesh Datta, the CSIO of Reliance Jio, “5G’s bandwidth will easily flood servers…with 5G, every individual would have a 1 Gbps worth of bandwidth, thereby attacks would become more drastic.”

What should service providers do to secure their network against DDoS attacks? 

In a whitepaper focused on service providers, but equally applicable to enterprises, Frost and Sullivan stress the following points:

  1. “…service providers may be better served by high-performance DDoS mitigation appliances with sufficient scalability to eliminate attacks, inline and in real time
  2. “An inline solution that provides DPI-based policy control capabilities ensures that firewalls and other security infrastructure are protected and functional at all times.”

Source: https://securityboulevard.com/2019/06/telegram-hit-by-powerful-ddos-attack-blames-china/

Telegram founder Pavel Durov has suggested that the Chinese government may have been behind a recent DDoS attack on the encrypted messaging service. Writing on Twitter, the founder called it a “state actor-sized DDoS” which came mainly from IP addresses located in China. Durov noted that the attack coincided with the ongoing protests in Hong Kong, where people are using encrypted messaging apps like Telegram to avoid detection while coordinating their protests.

The attack raises questions about whether the Chinese government is attempting to disrupt the encrypted messaging service and limit its effectiveness as an organizing tool for the hundreds of thousands of demonstrators taking part in the protests. Bloomberg reports that encrypted messaging apps like Telegram and FireChat are currently trending in Apple’s Hong Kong App Store, as demonstrators attempt to conceal their identities from Hong Kong’s Beijing-backed government.

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As well as using encrypted messaging apps, Bloomberg notes that protesters in Hong Kong are also covering their faces to avoid facial recognition systems. They’re also avoiding the use of public transit cards that can link location to identities.

Telegram’s Twitter account said that the service had been hit with “gadzillions of garbage requests,” mostly from IP addresses originating in China, as part of the DDoS attack which had stopped the service from being able to process legitimate requests from users. It said that these garbage requests tend to be generated by botnets, networks of computers infected with malware. “This case was not an exception,” Durov tweeted without elaborating.

A distributed denial of service attack may sound like hacker talk, but there’s a simple explanation behind it. Secure messaging app Telegram said it had to endure one Wednesday, and it gave an explanation that almost anyone could understand.

Telegram tweeted Wednesday morning that it was dealing with a DDoS attack. The app was down for many users across the globe, according to DownDetector. The downtime period was just a little over an hour, and while it was going on, Telegram explained how a DDoS attack works.

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“Imagine that an army of lemmings just jumped the queue at McDonald’s in front of you – and each is ordering a whopper,” Telegram tweeted. “The server is busy telling the whopper lemmings they came to the wrong place – but there are so many of them that the server can’t even see you to try and take your order.”

The tweets then went on to describe how hackers accomplish a DDoS attack.

“To generate these garbage requests, bad guys use ‘botnets’ made up of computers of unsuspecting users which were infected with malware at some point in the past. This makes a DDoS similar to the zombie apocalypse: one of the whopper lemmings just might be your grandpa,” the company said in another tweet.

Before giving the all-clear that the attack was over, Telegram tweeted that users’ data was safe.

“There’s a bright side: All of these lemmings are there just to overload the servers with extra work – they can’t take away your Big Mac and Coke,” the company tweeted.

Telegram has its share of run-ins with service denials, but they usually come from countries that want to shut the service down. Russia, Iran and Indonesia blocked the secure messaging app in recent years as governments in those countries argued that the service was used for anti-government protests and terrorism.

Telegram didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Source: https://www.cnet.com/news/telegrams-description-of-ddos-attack-is-the-best/